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The House That Doesn’t Burn: Turning Mud into Wildfire Resilient Housing

Turning Mud into Wildfire Resilient Housing

Author: Kat Kerlin

Published: June 30, 2021

Wildfire, in one way or another, touches nearly everyone who lives in California and, increasingly, the West.

Those of us living in California last fall can recall awakening to orange skies and smoke that blanketed nearly the entire state. Even if our home was untouched, we experienced the effects of wildfire. We inhaled them. We swiped them off our car in white, singed flakes. We dread them now.

Job Opening: SW Climate Adaptation Science Center Postdoc

SW Climate Adaptation Science Center Postdoc NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES / Letters and Science: Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies / UC Davis APPLICATION WINDOW

Open date: April 6th, 2021

Last review date: Monday, Apr 26, 2021 at 11:59pm (Pacific Time)
Applications received after this date will be reviewed by the search committee if the position has not yet been filled.

Performance Based Hurricane Engineering (PBHE) framework: Formulation and application to single-family housing and tall buildings

Hurricanes are among the most costly natural hazards affecting communities worldwide, in terms of both property damage and loss of life. The landfall of a hurricane involves different hazard sources (i.e., wind, windborne debris, flood, and rain) that interact to generate the hazard scenario for a given structure. Hence, a novel multi-hazard methodology is required to accurately estimate the risk due to hurricanes and to provide easily interpreted guidance to insurers, emergency administrators, builders, and owners on how to reduce potential losses.

Hurricane Loss Analysis for Single-Family Houses Considering Current and Changing Climate Conditions

Hurricanes are among the most costly natural hazards affecting communities worldwide, in terms of both property damage and loss of life. The landfall of a hurricane involves different hazard sources (i.e., wind, windborne debris, flood, and rain) that interact to generate the hazard scenario for a given structure. Hence, a novel multi-hazard methodology is required to accurately estimate the risk due to hurricanes and to provide easily interpreted guidance to insurers, emergency administrators, builders, and owners on how to reduce potential losses.

How to predict and manage California's fire risk in a changing climate

This year, wildfires in California have burned a record 4.2 million acres, damaged or destroyed over 10,000 structures and killed 35 people — and the season hasn’t even concluded. The situation has become increasingly dire, with six of the top 20 wildfires in state history taking place this year, including the largest wildfire on record. California’s top wildfire and climate researchers are responding to this incredible challenge, but they are also realizing there is a need to take a more collaborative, holistic and proactive approach to their work.

Leading Climate Adaptation since 2016!

While 2020 has brought a myriad of challenges to the world, the UC Davis Climate Adaptation Research Center has continued to pursue research that can support the communities affected by our changing climate. Co-Director Dr. Eric Chu's work has stood out to several renowned journals and is being recognized for his well-supported analyses.